Elderly with haemorrhoids

Getting older sometimes feel like your body is worn down one part after another. You face a number of different health issues, and it can be difficult to handle all different treatments and medications, but one place where you now can find ease, is in your new haemorrhoid treatment.

Haemorrhoids after the age of 50

Yes, haemorrhoids and ageing seems to go hand in hand. Over the counter treatments from the pharmacy, lifestyle changes and accurate hygiene can help to eliminate all except the most annoying symptoms.

Your body wears down over the years and this also applies to our internal parts. In the rectum we have mucous membranes, muscles and vessels that are all working to control what wants to come out. The wall of the colon is also worn down over the years and hence it is easier to get small wounds and cracks. These cracks get inflamed and swell. When this happens a few times it creates small piles of skin and vessels. These skin piles grow every time they get inflamed and in the end they becomes what we call haemorrhoids.

The rectum is not a straight vertical channel and when we sit on the toilet the pressure is much stronger on one side of the colon wall and wears the inside of the body.


Treatment for the elder

If you have been treated with ointments containing cortisone, it can be good to alternate your treatments so that the mucous membrane gets some rest. Cortisone can dry out the mucous membranes over time. Cortisone is effective but when you have reoccurring problems we recommend a drug free treatment, e.g. Hemor*Rite. One of the benefits of Hemor*Rite is that you dose it with time and not with weight or volume, which guarantees you the right dosage every time. Furthermore it can be used multiple times every day, with no side effects.

USP:

0 side effects
Stops bleeding effectively
Hygienic
Always the right dosage
Unattached from your medication

Rectal bleeding and the elderly

Important for pensioners and elderly is the right diagnosis of haemorrhoids and rectal bleeding. Blood in the stool is a common symptom of haemorrhoids but is also a symptom of gastrointestinal bleeding, adenoids and colon cancer. If you see blood on the toilet paper or in the stool, don’t just think you have haemorrhoids, contact your doctor and examine the symptoms more close.

Elderly people have a higher risk of these symptoms, especially if they are on medication with blood-thinning substances. Chronic bleeding itself can also be a problem for the elderly. Many pensioners are anaemic (suffer from blood-loss), and some haemorrhoids bleeds to indicate a need for iron supplement, surgery can then be needed. Since a lot of elderly are unaware of their suffering from blood-loss, the extra bleeding can make the situation worse for the body. If you take blood-thinning substances, this can cause the bleeding to be excessive and demand a more aggressive treatment.

Diet, fluids, activities and haemorrhoids

Some lifestyle changes for the elderly can contribute to haemorrhoids. Your diet balance changes when you get older because of a loss in appetite. To avoid constipation that results in haemorrhoids, you should try to increase the intake of fibre by eating more fruits, vegetables and wholegrain products. If you can’t get the fibre through normal food, food supplement can help prevent haemorrhoids.

Many retired are also unaware that they are somewhat “dried out”. The reason being that your mechanism indicating thirst can be comprehended with age. If you do not drink enough fluids, the stool hardens and causes constipation that can lead to haemorrhoids. You should try to drink at least 8 glasses of water every day, even when you are not thirsty.

Finally, physical activity is important to move the food in your bowel and help prevent haemorrhoids. Many seniors don’t exercise enough due to health problems and attenuated mobility, which again can cause bowel troubles. Speak to your doctor about creating a training program that is safe for you. A training program that will keep your bowel in form and keep constipation and haemorrhoids away

Quick facts about haemorrhoids and seniors

Haemorrhoids and ageing seems to go hand in hand.
Over the counter treatments from the pharmacy, lifestyle changes and accurate hygiene can helps to eliminate all except the most annoying symptoms
Your diet balance changes when older due to loss in appetite. To avoid constipation that results in haemorrhoids, try to increase the intake of fibre by eating more fruits, vegetables and wholegrain products
The mechanism indicating thirst can be comprehended with age. Try to drink at least 8 glasses of water every day, even when you are not thirsty, to avoid constipation.
Physical activity is important to move the food in the bowel and help prevent haemorrhoids. Many seniors don’t exercise enough due to health problems
Hemor*Rite is an efficient drug-free treatment for elderly with no (0) side effects – hence avoid joggling with different treatments and medication.
If you have out-cared help or receive hospital treatment, Hemor*Rite is a hygienic and a practical treatment method for your nursing staff and yourself. Easy to treat and easy to keep clean.
Stops bleeding effectively, if you use blood-thinning medication, Hemor*Rite helps you effectively since it retracts the blood vessels.

Warning

Blood in the stool is a common symptom of haemorrhoids but can also be a symptom of gastrointestinal bleeding, adenoids and colon cancer. All common diseases, when you get older. Hence ask or visit your local doctor for more advice